Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Nest-Site Selection, Nest Design and Nest-Entrance Orientation in Bachman's Sparrow

Thomas M. Haggerty
The Southwestern Naturalist
Vol. 40, No. 1 (Mar., 1995), pp. 62-67
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30054395
Page Count: 6
  • Get Access
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Nest-Site Selection, Nest Design and Nest-Entrance Orientation in Bachman's Sparrow
Preview not available

Abstract

Nest sites of Bachman's Sparrows (Aimophila aestivalis) in pine plantations in central Arkansas had greater tree density and less forb cover than non-nesting sites, but nesting sites could not be separated from non-nesting sites using multivariate analyses. At the microhabitat level, sides of nests had greater vegetation density between 0-60 and 0-180 cm than random points or nest entrances. Most nests were either partially (38%) or completely (55%) domed and most entrances were oriented to the north. Nest design was not affected by degree of concealment, nesting year, or nesting season, but grasses and forbs were taller around domed nests than at partially domed nests. No significant relationships among nest success, nest design, vegetation structure of the macrohabitat or microhabitat were found. This suggests that random predation and/or variation in predator density may have existed.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[62]
    [62]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
63
    63
  • Thumbnail: Page 
64
    64
  • Thumbnail: Page 
65
    65
  • Thumbnail: Page 
66
    66
  • Thumbnail: Page 
67
    67