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The Influence of Parenthood on the Work Effort of Married Men and Women

Gayle Kaufman and Peter Uhlenberg
Social Forces
Vol. 78, No. 3 (Mar., 2000), pp. 931-947
Published by: Oxford University Press
DOI: 10.2307/3005936
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3005936
Page Count: 17
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The Influence of Parenthood on the Work Effort of Married Men and Women
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Abstract

While the effect of parenthood on women's work has been well documented, little attention has been given to the potentially important link between work and parenthood for men. Two competing models of fatherhood suggest opposite effects of having children on work activities. The "good-provider" model predicts that fathers will work more than nonfathers, while the involved-father model predicts that fatherhood might encourage men to work less. We use data from the 1992-93 National Survey of Families and Households to examine the effect of parenthood on married men and women's employment and work hours. Findings indicate evidence for both models.

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