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Journal Article

The Howell Structure, Lincoln County, Tennessee

Kendall E. Born and Charles W. Wilson Jr.
The Journal of Geology
Vol. 47, No. 4 (May - Jun., 1939), pp. 371-388
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30059702
Page Count: 18

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Topics: Limestones, Shales, Impact craters, Breccia, Sandstones, Writers, Hermitages, Brasses, Magnetism, Geology
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The Howell Structure, Lincoln County, Tennessee
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Abstract

A small area of highly disturbed, contorted, and brecciated strata centering at Howell, in north-central Lincoln County, Tennessee, has been mapped and studied in detail. The salient structural feature is a circular area of intensely deformed Black River and Trenton rocks, which have been uplifted approximately 100 feet above their normal positions. This circular area is composed of jumbled blocks of limestone imbedded in a matrix of shatter breccia. The major deformation is believed to have been post-Trenton and pre-Fernvale in age. Overlying the shattered strata is the Fern vale formation, the relative thickness and lithology of which point directly toward deposition in a graded crater. The Fern vale shale unit shows moderately high dips. This partial disturbance of the Fernvale possibly indicates a mild renewal of the forces which caused the major deformation. The younger Silurian and Mississippian formations are relatively undisturbed. A magnetic survey indicates a "closure" of 335 gammas, 1 3/4 miles southwest of the center of the disturbance. While no conclusive evidence has been observed to support either the cryptovolcanic or the meteoritic hypothesis of origin, the Howell structure is considered tentatively as an example of the cryptovolcanic structures as interpreted by Bucher.

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