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Knowledge and Piety: Michael Moore's Career at the University of Paris and Collège de France, 1701-20

Liam Chambers
Eighteenth-Century Ireland / Iris an dá chultúr
Vol. 17 (2002), pp. 9-25
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30070962
Page Count: 17
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Knowledge and Piety: Michael Moore's Career at the University of Paris and Collège de France, 1701-20
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Abstract

When Michael Moore was elected rector of the University of Paris in 1701, he became the only Irishman to hold the position in ancien régime France. His career provides a window into the educational ideas and practices of one highly placed Irishman in the structures of the most important educational centre for Irish students in the eighteenth century. This article traces Moore's career in Italy in the 1690s, where he acquired experience of Tridentine educational reform. This was put to good use when he became principal of arts students at the Collège de Navarre in 1702. In the following year he was appointed professor of Greek and Latin philosophy at the Collège de France. Moore continued to defend Aristotelian Scholasticism, publishing two books on the subject in 1716 and 1726. The article argues that Moore's appeals for the retention of an Aristotelian philosophy curriculum were related to his educational reforms, and were particularly significant for the Irish clerical community in exile.

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