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Intestinal Flora of Monkeys and Dogs during Digestion and following the Direct Introduction of Food Substances into the Cecum and into Isolated Segments of Bowel

Elizabeth Petran
The Journal of Infectious Diseases
Vol. 57, No. 3 (Nov. - Dec., 1935), pp. 296-314
Published by: Oxford University Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30088997
Page Count: 19
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Intestinal Flora of Monkeys and Dogs during Digestion and following the Direct Introduction of Food Substances into the Cecum and into Isolated Segments of Bowel
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Abstract

Attempts have been made to alter the relationships of bacteria in the colon and in isolated segments of large intestine by changing the nutritional environment. Three dogs and one monkey with cecal fistulae, one monkey with an ileal fistula, two monkeys with isolated segments of large intestine, and one dog with a biliary fistula were used in this study. The organism which outnumbered all others in the intestinal contents (as determined by methods used in these experiments) was isolated and compared with the numbers of Bact. coli, and in some experiments with the numbers of streptococci, L. acidophilus and spore-forming anaerobes. The bacterial relationships in the ascending colon of dogs and monkeys were quite constant and were not appreciably altered during the digestive period by the incoming material from the small intestine. The intracecal injection of dextrose, lactose, peptone and bile (separately) was without noticeable effect on the numbers and relationships of organisms present in the colon. Feeding an exclusive liver diet to two monkeys caused a great increase in the numbers of sporulating anaerobes in the intestinal contents of one of the animals. The oral administration of lactose markedly stimulated the growth of L. acidophilus in the large intestine of these monkeys. The exclusion of bile from the intestine of a dog did not affect the flora of the large bowel. The flora of isolated segments of colon in two monkeys was not significantly changed by the injection of bread and milk or lactose into these segments.

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