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Coagulase Production by Staphylococcus aureus: II. Growth and Coagulase Production in Complex and Chemically Defined Mediums-Comparison of Chemically Defined Mediums

Judith Marston and W. J. Fahlberg
The Journal of Infectious Diseases
Vol. 106, No. 2 (Mar. - Apr., 1960), pp. 116-122
Published by: Oxford University Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30098970
Page Count: 7
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Coagulase Production by Staphylococcus aureus: II. Growth and Coagulase Production in Complex and Chemically Defined Mediums-Comparison of Chemically Defined Mediums
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Abstract

1. There appears to be a correlation between the active growth of Staphylococcus aureus and the ability of the organisms to produce coagulase. Coagu-lase is measurable during the lag phase and throughout the logarithmic phase of growth. When the organisms reach the stationary phase, coagulase production apparently ceases and titers remain relatively constant during the 48-hour test period. Previously reported work has indicated that prolonged incubation for 4 days does not result in titers higher than those obtained in 48 hours. 2. Comparison of the two chemically defined mediums revealed a basic difference in amino acid composition, and the difference was reflected in the ability of each medium to support coagulase production by Staph, aureus. The addition of L-glutamic acid, L-histidine HC1 and L-lysine HC1 stimulated coagulase production in chemically defined mediums. The biochemical mechanisms involved in this stimulation were discussed on a hypothetical basis. 3. It was felt that the production of coagulase in a chemically defined medium might be a starting point for further studies on a purified coagulase preparation; certainly coagulase produced in a defined medium represents a substance free of some of the contaminating large molecular weight proteins assumed to be present in any complex infusion medium. Further study of this substance should provide substantial information on the nature of coagulase, its mode of action, its antigenicity, and its relation to the pathogenicity of the staphylococci which produce it.

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