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The Influence of the Route of Administration of Newcastle Disease Virus on Host Response: II. Studies on Artificial Passive Immunity

Charles W. Beard and Bernard C. Easterday
The Journal of Infectious Diseases
Vol. 117, No. 1 (Feb., 1967), pp. 62-65
Published by: Oxford University Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30103737
Page Count: 4
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The Influence of the Route of Administration of Newcastle Disease Virus on Host Response: II. Studies on Artificial Passive Immunity
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Abstract

Large amounts of intravenously administered anti-Newcastle disease virus chicken serum failed to protect chickens from infection when they were exposed to aerosols of a virulent strain of Newcastle disease virus. They were protected when the challenge was made by intramuscular injection. The greater the amount of immune serum injected the higher the hemagglutination inhibition antibody titer was 1 day later and the lower the active antibody titer was 21 days after challenge. Birds that received the globulin fraction that was precipitated with ammonium sulfate and restored to the original serum volume responded to challenge in a similar manner. Control birds that were administered comparable amounts of normal serum became infected after exposure. Failure of circulating antibodies to protect the epithelium of the trachea from infection with Newcastle disease virus was disucssed.

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