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Hepatitis B Antigenemia in Remote Tribes of Northern Kenya, Northern Liberia, and Northern Rhodesia

Labius N. Mutanda and Maurice A. Mufson
The Journal of Infectious Diseases
Vol. 130, No. 4 (Oct., 1974), pp. 406-408
Published by: Oxford University Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30106151
Page Count: 3
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Hepatitis B Antigenemia in Remote Tribes of Northern Kenya, Northern Liberia, and Northern Rhodesia
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Abstract

Hepatitis B antigen (HB Ag) was detected by complement fixation procedures in 32 of 343 persons tested (9.3%) from the Turkanas of Lokori and Kalokol (northern Kenya), the Korekore people living on the Urungwe Reserve (northern Rhodesia), and the Mano tribe residing in Nyao (northern Liberia). The prevalence of HB Ag was 12.2% in Turkana, 8.7% in Korekore, and 6.4% in Mano tribesmen. Turkana males exhibited the highest prevalence of HB Ag. By comparison, not a single male from the Mano people had detectable HB Ag. Individuals of all ages were positive for HB Ag, but no age-related trends were evident.

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