Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Role of Interferon in Prophylaxis of Rabies after Exposure

Tadeusz J. Wiktor, Hilary Koprowski, John R. Mitchell and Thomas C. Merigan
The Journal of Infectious Diseases
Vol. 133, Supplement. Antivirals with Clinical Potential (Jun., 1976), pp. A260-A265
Published by: Oxford University Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30107970
Page Count: 6
  • Download ($42.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Role of Interferon in Prophylaxis of Rabies after Exposure
Preview not available

Abstract

Rhesus monkeys were completely protected from rabies by a single dose of experimental, highly concentrated, rabies virus vaccine prepared from virus propagated in cultures of human diploid cells and administered several hours after infection with street rabies virus. Protection seemed to be related to the high antigenicity of the vaccine and to its ability to induce interferon in vaccinated animals. Only partial protection was afforded by one or three inoculations of less concentrated vaccines that were prepared from cultures of human diploid cells or primary hamster kidney cells and that were not capable of inducing interferon. The level of virus-neutralizing antibody induced by vaccination could not be correlated with the final outcome of the disease. The simultaneous inoculation of vaccine and interferon inducers (polyribocytidylic acid homopolymer pair or Newcastle disease virus) did not improve the results obtained with vaccine alone, a fact which indicates that factors other than interferon and antibody may play an important role in the treatment of rabies after exposure.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
A260
    A260
  • Thumbnail: Page 
A261
    A261
  • Thumbnail: Page 
A262
    A262
  • Thumbnail: Page 
A263
    A263
  • Thumbnail: Page 
A264
    A264
  • Thumbnail: Page 
A265
    A265