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Echoviruses and Coxsackie B Viruses That Use Human Decay-Accelerating Factor (DAF) as a Receptor Do Not Bind the Rodent Analogues of DAF

O. Brad Spiller, Ian G. Goodfellow, David J. Evans, Jeffrey W. Almond and B. Paul Morgan
The Journal of Infectious Diseases
Vol. 181, No. 1 (Jan., 2000), pp. 340-343
Published by: Oxford University Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30111308
Page Count: 4
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Echoviruses and Coxsackie B Viruses That Use Human Decay-Accelerating Factor (DAF) as a Receptor Do Not Bind the Rodent Analogues of DAF
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Abstract

Many serotypes of echovirus (EV) and Coxsackie B virus (CBV) bind human decay-accelerating factor (DAF) and use it as a receptor for infection. Analogues for DAF have been isolated from mice and rats and characterized; these analogues have amino acid identities to human DAF of ~60%. EV serotypes 3, 6′, 7, 11-13, and 29 and CBV serotypes 1, 3, and 5 caused hemagglutination of human erythrocytes but not rat or mouse erythrocytes, suggesting failure to bind rodent DAF. To confirm this evidence, radiolabeled viruses were incubated with transfected Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells that were abundantly expressing each type of DAF. Only cells that expressed human DAF bound virus. Although binding of EV and CBV was specific for human DAF, complement inhibition by DAF expressed in CHO cells was similar for each analogue.

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