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Maternal Age and Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection: Screening of Two Diverse Newborn Populations, 1980-1990

Karen B. Fowler, Sergio Stagno and Robert F. Pass
The Journal of Infectious Diseases
Vol. 168, No. 3 (Sep., 1993), pp. 552-556
Published by: Oxford University Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30113417
Page Count: 5
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Maternal Age and Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection: Screening of Two Diverse Newborn Populations, 1980-1990
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Abstract

Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the leading cause of congenital viral infection in the United States. To prevent damaging congenital CMV infections, it is necessary to have accurate population estimates of prevalence and to identify maternal factors associated with an elevated risk of congenital infection in the newborn. From 1980 through 1990, 17,163 offspring of predominately low-income nonwhite women who delivered at a public hospital and 9892 newborns of predominately midto upper-income white women who delivered at a private hospital were screened for congenital CMV infection. Women <20 years old (adjusted prevalence odds ratio [POR], 4.8; 950Zo confidence interval [CI], 2.6-8.9) at the public hospital and all nonwhite women (adjusted POR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.1-2.2) had an increased risk of delivering an infected newborn. Newborns of adolescent women in both populations had the highest prevalence of clinically apparent infection. Offspring of nonwhite low-income adolescents are at greatest risk for congenital CMV infection and more damaging sequelae.

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