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Whence Philosophy of Biology?

Jason M. Byron
The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science
Vol. 58, No. 3 (Sep., 2007), pp. 409-422
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30115182
Page Count: 14
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Whence Philosophy of Biology?
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Abstract

A consensus exists among contemporary philosophers of biology about the history of their field. According to the received view, mainstream philosophy of science in the 1930s, 40s, and 50s focused on physics and general epistemology, neglecting analyses of the 'special sciences', including biology. The subdiscipline of philosophy of biology emerged (and could only have emerged) after the decline of logical positivism in the 1960s and 70s. In this article, I present bibliometric data from four major philosophy of science journals (Erkenntnis, Philosophy of Science, Synthese, and the British Journal for the Philosophy of Science), covering 1930-59, which challenge this view.

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