Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Protection against Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection in Persons with Repeated Exposure: Evidence for T Cell Immunity in the Absence of Inherited CCR5 Coreceptor Defects

W. C. Goh, J. Markee, R. E. Akridge, M. Meldorf, L. Musey, T. Karchmer, M. Krone, A. Collier, L. Corey, M. Emerman and M. J. McElrath
The Journal of Infectious Diseases
Vol. 179, No. 3 (Mar., 1999), pp. 548-557
Published by: Oxford University Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30117306
Page Count: 10
  • Download ($42.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Protection against Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection in Persons with Repeated Exposure: Evidence for T Cell Immunity in the Absence of Inherited CCR5 Coreceptor Defects
Preview not available

Abstract

It has been hypothesized that protection against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection may result from either acquired host immunity, inheritance of a dysfunctional CCR5 HIV-1 coreceptor, or a low or attenuated virus inoculum. Thirty-seven HIV-1-uninfected persons engaging in repeated high-risk sexual activity with an HIV-1-infected partner were prospectively studied to determine the contribution of these factors in protecting against HIV1 transmission. More than one-third (13/36) demonstrated HIV-1-specific cytotoxicity, and this activity significantly correlated with the wild type CCR5 genotype (P = .03). Only 1 subject (3%) demonstrated the homozygous CCR5 32-bp deletion (△32/△32). Median plasma HIV-1 RNA levels from 18 HIV-1-infected sex partners were not statistically different from those of matched infected control patients. These results indicate that inheritance of the △32 CCR5 mutation does not account for the majority of persistently HIV-1-resistant cases, and the presence of cellular immunity in these persons suggests either undetected infection or protective immunity.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
548
    548
  • Thumbnail: Page 
549
    549
  • Thumbnail: Page 
550
    550
  • Thumbnail: Page 
551
    551
  • Thumbnail: Page 
552
    552
  • Thumbnail: Page 
553
    553
  • Thumbnail: Page 
554
    554
  • Thumbnail: Page 
555
    555
  • Thumbnail: Page 
556
    556
  • Thumbnail: Page 
557
    557