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Cardiopulmonary Effects of Propofol Infusion in Canvasback Ducks (Aythya valisineria)

Karen L. Machin and Nigel A. Caulkett
Journal of Avian Medicine and Surgery
Vol. 13, No. 3 (Sep., 1999), pp. 167-172
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30130680
Page Count: 6
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Cardiopulmonary Effects of Propofol Infusion in Canvasback Ducks (Aythya valisineria)
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Abstract

Appropriate loading and infusion dosages of IV propofol were determined in five adult female canvasback ducks (Aythya valisineria). In these ducks, the dosage was determined as 15 mg/kg of propofol IV loading dose, delivered over 1 minute, followed by a constant infusion rate of 0.8 mg/kg/minute to maintain anesthesia. The cardiopulmonary effects and quality of anesthesia were then evaluated in seven canvasback ducks during constant infusion. Ducks were instrumented (arterial and venous catheters) during isoflurane anesthesia. Systolic, mean, and diastolic pressures, heart and respiratory rates, and esophageal temperature were recorded before propofol anesthesia (baseline and after the duck had recovered from isoflurane anesthesia), and at 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, and 35 minutes (5 minutes after infusion was discontinued) after induction. Arterial blood samples were collected at baseline and at 5, 10, 15, 30, and 35 minutes after induction and were analyzed for partial pressures of arterial oxygen (PaO₂) and arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO₂) and arterial pH. One duck died during dose determination and another during the cardiopulmonary study, which suggests a low therapeutic index in canvasback ducks. During the anesthetic period (1-30 minutes), body temperature and PaO₂ values decreased significantly and values of mean arterial pressure and PaCO₂ increased. The arterial pH decreased significantly at 5, 10, and 15 minutes after induction. Five minutes after propofol was discontinued (35 minutes), none of the physiologic values measured were significantly different from baseline values. Constant infusion of propofol in ducks has limited use in a clinical setting unless anesthetic depth is monitored and adjusted to accommodate individual variation in dose requirements. The major adverse effect of propofol is respiratory depression, and artificial ventilation of birds during propofol anesthesia is recommended to prevent complications.

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