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Foodborne Outbreaks of Human Toxoplasmosis

Won-Young Choi, Ho-Woo Nam, No-Hoon Kwak, Won Huh, Yang-Ree Kim, Moon-Won Kang, Seung-Yull Cho and J. P. Dubey
The Journal of Infectious Diseases
Vol. 175, No. 5 (May, 1997), pp. 1280-1282
Published by: Oxford University Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30132668
Page Count: 3
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Foodborne Outbreaks of Human Toxoplasmosis
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Abstract

Two outbreaks of acute toxoplasmosis involving 8 adult patients in Korea were linked to eating uncooked pork. In the first outbreak, 3 patients developed unilateral chorioretinitis within 3 months of eating a meal consisting of raw spleen and liver of a wild pig. In the second outbreak, 5 of 11 soldiers who ate a meal consisting of raw liver of a domestic pig developed lymphadenopathy. All 8 patients had high levels of IgG Toxoplasma gondii antibodies (⩾1:1024) in the Sabin-Feldman dye test, modified agglutination test incorporating mercaptoethanol, and latex agglutination test. T. gondii IgM antibodies persisted in these patients for several months. Most patients had a favorable response to anti-T. gondii chemotherapy with pyrimethamine and sulfanomides.

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