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Cost-Effectiveness of Hepatitis A Vaccination in Healthcare Workers

Shanon Smith, Stefan Weber, Todd Wiblin and Mary Nettleman
Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology
Vol. 18, No. 10 (Oct., 1997), pp. 688-691
DOI: 10.2307/30141508
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30141508
Page Count: 4
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Cost-Effectiveness of Hepatitis A Vaccination in Healthcare Workers
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Abstract

Objective: To study the cost-effectiveness of vaccination for hepatitis A. Setting: Hypothetical analysis of students currently enrolled in medical school in the United States. Method: A Markov-based model was developed using data from the literature, actual hospital costs, and an annual discount rate of 5%. The incidence rate was based on the lowest annual rate for the US population during the past decade. Results: Over the lifetimes of students currently in medical school, the model estimated that there would be 286 hepatitis A cases with four deaths and 107 lost years of life. With routine vaccination, these numbers would decrease to 17, 0.3, and 6, respectively. The costs per life-year saved and quality adjusted life-year saved were $58,000 and $47,000, respectively. Serologic screening prior to vaccination was less cost-effective than universal vaccination. If the incidence of hepatitis A was underestimated by a factor of 5, the cost per life-year saved would decrease to $5,500. If the incidence of hepatitis was underestimated by a factor of 10, vaccination would result in a net cost savings. Conclusion: We conclude that the cost per life-year saved by routine hepatitis A vaccination was similar to many other standard medical modalities. For routine vaccination of medical students to be cost-saving, the incidence rate for hepatitis A must be at least 10 times higher than the rate presently reported for the general population. Serological screening prior to vaccination was not cost-effective.

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