Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Bacterial Mycophagy: Definition and Diagnosis of a Unique Bacterial-Fungal Interaction

Johan H. J. Leveau and Gail M. Preston
The New Phytologist
Vol. 177, No. 4 (2008), pp. 859-876
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the New Phytologist Trust
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30142230
Page Count: 18
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Preview not available
Preview not available

Abstract

This review analyses the phenomenon of bacterial mycophagy, which we define as a set of phenotypic behaviours that enable bacteria to obtain nutrients from living fungi and thus allow the conversion of fungal into bacterial biomass. We recognize three types of bacterial strategies to derive nutrition from fungi: necrotrophy, extracellular biotrophy and endocellular biotrophy. Each is characterized by a set of uniquely sequential and differently overlapping interactions with the fungal target. We offer a detailed analysis of the nature of these interactions, as well as a comprehensive overview of methodologies for assessing and quantifying their individual contributions to the mycophagy phenotype. Furthermore, we discuss future prospects for the study and exploitation of bacterial mycophagy, including the need for appropriate tools to detect bacterial mycophagy in situ in order to be able to understand, predict and possibly manipulate the way in which mycophagous bacteria affect fungal activity, turnover, and community structure in soils and other ecosystems.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
859
    859
  • Thumbnail: Page 
860
    860
  • Thumbnail: Page 
861
    861
  • Thumbnail: Page 
862
    862
  • Thumbnail: Page 
863
    863
  • Thumbnail: Page 
864
    864
  • Thumbnail: Page 
865
    865
  • Thumbnail: Page 
866
    866
  • Thumbnail: Page 
867
    867
  • Thumbnail: Page 
868
    868
  • Thumbnail: Page 
869
    869
  • Thumbnail: Page 
870
    870
  • Thumbnail: Page 
871
    871
  • Thumbnail: Page 
872
    872
  • Thumbnail: Page 
873
    873
  • Thumbnail: Page 
874
    874
  • Thumbnail: Page 
875
    875
  • Thumbnail: Page 
876
    876