Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Epidemic Keratoconjunctivitis in a University Medical Center Ophthalmology Clinic; Need for Re-Evaluation of the Design and Disinfection of Instruments

Denise Koo, Brenda Bouvier, Michele Wesley, Paul Courtright and Arthur Reingold
Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology
Vol. 10, No. 12 (Dec., 1989), pp. 547-552
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30144235
Page Count: 6
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Epidemic Keratoconjunctivitis in a University Medical Center Ophthalmology Clinic; Need for Re-Evaluation of the Design and Disinfection of Instruments
Preview not available

Abstract

During the period from early December 1987 to late January 1988, an outbreak of epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC) caused by adenovirus type 8 occurred at a university medical center eye clinic. A telephone survey of patients revealed an attack rate of 17% among patients seen during the epidemic period. A case-control study demonstrated that development of EKC was associated with exposure to pneumotonometry and to three caregivers. After controlling for exposure to pneumotonometry, however, only exposure to one caregiver was significantly associated with risk of the disease. On January 19, 1988, after recognition of the outbreak, the eye clinic instituted additional infection control measures. A survey of patients seen the following week showed a substantial decrease in the attack rate (1.9%). Before these control measures were implemented, clinic personnel had followed the manufacturer's recommendations and disinfected pneumotonometer tips with 70% isopropyl alcohol, fearing that other disinfectants would corrode the instrument metal. Isopropyl alcohol, shown to have limited activity against adenovirus in vitro, also was being used to "disinfect" pneumotonometer tips between uses at six other area eye clinics polled by telephone. The results of this study demonstrate the need for changes in the design and manufacture of equipment used in the eye clinic. [Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 1989; 10(12):547-552.]

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
547
    547
  • Thumbnail: Page 
548
    548
  • Thumbnail: Page 
549
    549
  • Thumbnail: Page 
550
    550
  • Thumbnail: Page 
551
    551
  • Thumbnail: Page 
552
    552