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On the Characteristics of the Population of Central and Southern India.

Walter Elliot
The Journal of the Ethnological Society of London (1869-1870)
Vol. 1, No. 2 (1869), pp. 94-128
DOI: 10.2307/3014444
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3014444
Page Count: 35
Subjects: Anthropology
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On the Characteristics of the Population of Central and Southern India.
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Notes and References

This item contains 60 references.

[Footnotes]
  • *
    This reference contains 3 citations:
    • Diwar, Wilson's Glossary
    • Stephen Hislop, " the worship is spread over all parts of the country, from Berar to the extreme east of Bustar, and that not merely among the Hin- duised aborigines, who had begun to honour Khandova, etc., but among the rudest and most savage tribes. He is generally adored in the form of an unshapely stone covered with vermilion."-Aboriginal Tribes, page 16.
    • The Assaqas or pariah (holt,iara) washermen of Mysore, " worship a god called Bhun?a Devaru, who is represented by a shapeless stone.... At the new moon they occasionally observe a feast in honour of deceased parents."-Buchanan's Journey, i, 338.
  • This reference contains 2 citations:
    • Randqa, in Mahratta, " is a libertine, a dissolute fellow."
    • Ranj/4a or .Ranjhan is the name given to Leander by Hindu poets.-Shakespeare's Dictionary.
  • The Rev. Stephen Hislop mentions Pot-linga as one of the deities worshipped by the Gonds in Eastern Berar.-Aboriginal Tfribes, page 15.
  • *
    This reference contains 2 citations:
    • Probably fromn hari or hal, a plough
    • mariah, a victimn.-Wilson's Glossary.
  • Here they are called Shietsanadis alnd Halabs.
  • *
    General Hardwicke's account of the Man-eater, in Trans. R. As. Soc.iii. 379.
  • *
    This reference contains 2 citations:
    • A similar custom, taken probably from the former, prevailed in the Anthystirian Dionysia two months later, called the "waggon- revel" (KCYwos * P' aawv), where the objurgations were delivered fromn a wag- gon.-Siaith's Afyth. IDict.
    • Lex., PartI, p. 291.
  • *
    Macpherson, Campbell, MVicecar, and Frye, in published state- ments and reports to the Government of India passirn.
  • Coinp. Gram., p. 496-7.
  • Replies, etc., Relative to Mirési Right, Appendix lxxxi.
  • §
    1A., lxxxii.
  • *
    Comp. Gram., 497.
  • *
    Comp7arative Grammar, 497.
  • Ellis's lIcdrisi Riqht.
  • G1lossary; but it is true that hol. signifies pollution. The same words are found in Telegu; pola, " land"; whence polamu, " a field"; polimera, " a boundary". A sinmilar word for land occurs in Hindi, polach, " arable land."-Wilson's Glossary.
  • *
    This reference contains 3 citations:
    • Macpherson'sMemorials of Service, 98, 108, 131
    • Caampbell's Personal Narrative, 120.
    • Report to Supreme Government, 20th April, 1851.
  • *
    Buchanan's Journey, ii, 128.
  • *
    Jour. As. Soc., Bengal, xx, 547.
  • They now exceed 2,000,000 souls.-Times, Nov. 20th, 1868.
  • lb., p. 350.
  • Calcutta Christian Observer, viii.
  • ||
    Sherwill, p. 408-10.
  • Ib., p. 582.
  • **
    Aladras Clhristian Herald, May 27th, 1857.
  • *
    Madras Christian Herald, pp. 570, 572.
  • Friend of India, xxii, 362-3.
  • This reference contains 2 citations:
    • Smtpplenzentary Glossary, p. 6
    • As. Rev., ix, 438.
  • *
    Caldwell's Records of the Primitive Tamul Mind and Manners, as deduced from a-ncient vocabularies of the language.Comp. Gr. Also, Ellis's Mirasi Right, Appendix xvii
  • Mad. Jour. of Lit. Soc., vii, 310.
  • *
    lb., 319.
  • *
    Sherwill describes a simnilar scene among the Santals, p. 571.
  • The same practice also subsists among the Gottas, a tribe of Gonds on the Godavery.-Jubhlpoor Reports.
  • *
    This reference contains 2 citations:
    • Lit., "The five classes."
    • panch-bandam, the five slave castes, apud Buchanant Jour., i, 19, 20.
[Footnotes]
  • Proceedings of the Madras Government for the abolition of Men- KIval Fees.
[Footnotes]
  • Figured in Madras Journal, Lit. and Sc., vol. xx, p. 76.
  • From ni8ha, " to sit down".
  • *
    This reference contains 2 citations:
    • Journey through Mysore, i, 249
    • ii, 59.
  • ±
    16., iii, 17.
  • Buch. Jour., iii, 106-7..
  • §
    lb., ii, 497.
  • *
    Hislop gives a similar instance in the Badiyas and Halwas of GWond- wana, p. 21.
  • *
    Madras Journal, vols. i and ii.
  • Wilson's Glossary, voce Parasurama.
  • §
    Calcutta Review.
  • Sir John Malcolm's account of them in Transactions, Lit. Soc. Born., vol. iii, p. 86.
[Footnotes]
  • *
    Or. Sans. Texts, Part i, Sect. xv.
  • *
    The running hand of the Mahratta character or Mori is still called RBakshasalipi or " Rakshasa writing".
  • This reference contains 3 citations:
    • Buch. Jour., i, 241, 245, 349, 394
    • ii, 129, 241
    • iii, 52, 253, and pas8irn.
  • *
    Jubbulpoor Rep. Introd., p. 10.
  • Manu, ch. iii, 20, 33, 34.
  • 1‡
    Glossary.
  • §
    This reference contains 2 citations:
    • Ju6bbulpoor Rept., Part i, pp. 5-7
    • Part ii, pp. 59474, etc.
  • *
    Tod, Ann., i, 80.
  • This reference contains 2 citations:
    • Tod, Ann., i, 91
    • ii, 440.
  • This reference contains 2 citations:
    • Tod, i, 94
    • ii, 442-3.
  • *
    Tod, i, 97.
  • This reference contains 2 citations:
    • Jour. R. As. Soc., iv, 5
    • Madras Jour. Lit., vii, 197, and xxii, 78.
  • Mad. Jour. Lit., xiii, 46, 52.
  • §
    Tod, i, 97.
  • ||
    Jour. R. As. Soc., iv, 37.