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Daily Meatal Care for Prevention of Catheter-Associated Bacteriuria: Results Using Frequent Applications of Polyantibiotic Cream

David C. Classen, Robert A. Larsen, John P. Burke, David W. Alling and Lane E. Stevens
Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology
Vol. 12, No. 3 (Mar., 1991), pp. 157-162
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30146932
Page Count: 6
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Daily Meatal Care for Prevention of Catheter-Associated Bacteriuria: Results Using Frequent Applications of Polyantibiotic Cream
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Abstract

Objective: To determine the efficacy of meatal treatment with a polyantibiotic cream in the prevention of bacteriuria during transurethral bladder catheterization. Design: Randomized controlled trial. Setting: Community teaching hospital. Patients: Adult patients who underwent closed urinary catheter drainage for short and intermediate durations (two to 30 days). Intervention: Polyantibiotic cream containing polymyxin B sulfate, neomycin sulfate, and gramicidin was applied to the urethral meatuscatheter interface three times daily from the first day of catheterization until bacteriuria was found. The onset of bacteriuria was defined as the day the colonizing species first achieved a colony count of ≥ 1000 colonies/ml. Patients randomized to the control group received routine meatal care with cleansing of the meatal surface during daily bathing. Results: Among 2,923 patients who were randomly allocated to receive either the protocol meatal care or routine care, the evaluable study population consisted of 747 patients who were nonbacteriuric and who remained catheterized for more than two days. Overall, 26 (6.8%) of 383 patients given the polyantibiotic treatment acquired bacteriuria, as compared to 37 (10.1%) of 364 patients not given this treatment (p=.167). A Cox proportional hazards regression analysis showed that, among putative risk factors including lack of meatal care, only female gender, a meatal swab culture yielding gram-negative rods or enterococci, and lack of antibiotic use during catheterization were independently associated with the development of bacteriuria. Conclusions: The adverse effect of meatal care noted in earlier studies of a disinfectant ointment applied twice daily was not found in this study of an antimicrobial preparation in a cream vehicle applied three times daily. However, the results do not support meatal care as an efficacious method to prevent catheter-associated bacteriuria in all patients.

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