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Schach in Wuthenow: "Psychographie" und "Spiegelung" im 14. Kapitel von Fontanes "Schach von Wuthenow"

H. Rudolf Vaget
Monatshefte
Vol. 61, No. 1 (Spring, 1969), pp. 1-14
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30154639
Page Count: 14
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Schach in Wuthenow: "Psychographie" und "Spiegelung" im 14. Kapitel von Fontanes "Schach von Wuthenow"
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Abstract

Chapter 14 of Schach von Wuthenow not only marks a turning-point in the plot of this novel-eventually leading to Schach's suicide-it is also of unusual interest with regard to Fontane's development as a novelist. While in the other chapters of the novel, as in most of his works, Fontane relied primarily on the technique of characterization through conversation, he employs in this chapter, for the first time on a larger scale, more diversified methods of indirect characterization. They are, as a detailed analysis can show, essentially symbolic in nature and can best be understood in the light of Fontane's own concept of "Spiegelung." Apart from conversations, in which much of the Fontane literature tends to see his most characteristic if not sole artistic distinction, this device of "Spiegelung" through descriptions of landscape, objects, gestures, etc. must be regarded as an essential element of Fontane's novelistic technique, not only in Schach but also in his later works.

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