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Silent Cinema

Anton Kaes
Monatshefte
Vol. 82, No. 3 (Fall, 1990), pp. 246-256
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30155279
Page Count: 11
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Silent Cinema
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Abstract

Silent film has served as a testing ground for the development not only of an artistic cinema but also of a methodology that sheds light on film in its aesthetic as well as social dimension. Research into silent film in Germany has so far pursued three main directions: (1) it documented and described the various endeavors by German intellectuals and filmmakers to legitimate the new medium both as avantgarde art and modern mass spectacle; (2) it explored the close and problematic relationship between the Expressionist cinema of the Weimar Republic and the ideology of the Third Reich; (3) it analyzed questions of film audience and gender. Future approaches to silent cinema research should be informed by the recent revitalization of cultural history with its focus on the interplay between text and context and its emphasis on discourses that cross disciplinary borders.

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