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Renal Clearance Studies in Stubble Quail Coturnix pectoralis and King Quail Coturnix chinensis under Conditions of Hydration, Dehydration, and Salt Loading

Juliet R. Roberts, R. V. Baudinette and J. F. Wheldrake
Physiological Zoology
Vol. 58, No. 3 (May - Jun., 1985), pp. 340-349
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30156005
Page Count: 10
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Renal Clearance Studies in Stubble Quail Coturnix pectoralis and King Quail Coturnix chinensis under Conditions of Hydration, Dehydration, and Salt Loading
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Abstract

Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and effective renal plasma flow (ERPF) were measured in two species of Australian quail-stubble quail, Coturnix pectoralis, and king quail, Coturnix chinensis-under conditions of full hydration, dehydration, and salt loading. Iodine-125-labeled [$^{125}I$$] sodium iothalamate was found to be a suitable GFR marker for these species, since its clearance is not significantly different from that of inulin. Creatinine is secreted by the renal tubules of stubble quail and is therefore unsuitable as a GFR marker. The GFR of hydrated birds was 8.31 ml(min· kg)⁻¹ for stubble quail and 10.3 ml(min · kg)⁻¹ for king quail. For both species, GFR was reduced by dehydration and salt loading. ERPF for hydrated animals was 36.9 ml(min · kg)⁻¹ and 30.7 ml(min · kg)⁻¹ for stubble and king quail, respectively. ERPF decreased in both species in response to dehydration and in stubble quail to salt loading. An allometric equation relating GFR to body weight (M) is derived using 39 data points from 13 avian species, including those from the present study: GFR ml· min⁻¹ = 2.37 $M^{0.76$$ (r = .92; n = 39; no. of spp. = 13) (M = kg). Salt-loading and dehydration reduced GFR to a greater extent in stubble quail than in king quail. This response may be correlated with the more arid natural habitat of stubble quail.

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