Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

A Field Study of Thermoregulation in the Carpenter Bee Xylocopa virginica virginica (Hymenoptera: Anthophoridae)

Joel M. Baird
Physiological Zoology
Vol. 59, No. 2 (Mar. - Apr., 1986), pp. 157-168
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30156029
Page Count: 12
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($19.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
A Field Study of Thermoregulation in the Carpenter Bee Xylocopa virginica virginica (Hymenoptera: Anthophoridae)
Preview not available

Abstract

Thoracic, abdominal, and head temperatures were measured in individual fieldcollected Xylocopa virginica virginica performing a variety of behaviors over a wide range of ambient conditions. The bees were highly endothermic during activity, with thoracic temperatures ($T_{TH}$) that ranged from 31.4 to 48.5 C (at ambient temperatures, $T_{A}$, from 15 to 35 C) and a mean thoracic temperature excess ($T_{TH}-T_{A}$) of approximately 16 C under low insolation levels. Linear regressions of $T_{TH}$ on ambient temperature indicate a well-developed thermoregulatory ability (slopes of $T_{TH}$ vs. $T_{A}$: male = .25; female = .23). Air temperature, solar radiation, and, in some cases, humidity and wind speed significantly affected body temperatures. Behavior, too, significantly affected body temperatures, apparently in large part because of associated variations in heat production as well as environmental effects on body temperature. Head temperature ($T_{H}$) appears to be regulated, at least in males, by control of heat transfer to the head from the thorax. During activities requiring high energy expenditure, males regulated $T_{TH}$ and $T_{H}$ significantly better than females. This may be related to differences in the behavioral requirements of males and females.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
157
    157
  • Thumbnail: Page 
158
    158
  • Thumbnail: Page 
159
    159
  • Thumbnail: Page 
160
    160
  • Thumbnail: Page 
161
    161
  • Thumbnail: Page 
162
    162
  • Thumbnail: Page 
163
    163
  • Thumbnail: Page 
164
    164
  • Thumbnail: Page 
[165]
    [165]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
166
    166
  • Thumbnail: Page 
167
    167
  • Thumbnail: Page 
168
    168