Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

"Laziness" and Hypothermia as a Foraging Strategy in Flower Scarabs (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae)

Bernd Heinrich and Elizabeth Mcclain
Physiological Zoology
Vol. 59, No. 2 (Mar. - Apr., 1986), pp. 273-282
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30156041
Page Count: 10
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($19.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
"Laziness" and Hypothermia as a Foraging Strategy in Flower Scarabs (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae)
Preview not available

Abstract

Flower scarabs can warm up endothermically from 20 C to flight temperatures near 36 C in 3 min. Despite their impressive capacity for endothermy, however, foraging beetles stop heat production immediately on landing on a flower. In addition, they seek shade within seconds of landing and allow body temperatures to follow ambient thermal conditions. Foraging beetles spend at least 98% of their time perched and feed slowly. In the laboratory, beetles that are handled or otherwise disturbed warm up repeatedly by endothermic shivering, but in the field undisturbed beetles generally warm up to fly to another flower only when they have the opportunity to warm up by basking. Unlike other large strong-flying insects so far examined, these beetles do not regulate (stabilize) their thoracic temperature in flight, and they restrict flight to a narrow range of ambient temperature. We speculate that their lack of maintenance of an elevated body temperature ("hypothermia") when not in flight and their seemingly lackadaisical foraging is related to low foraging competition leading to a minimization of energy expenditure.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
273
    273
  • Thumbnail: Page 
274
    274
  • Thumbnail: Page 
275
    275
  • Thumbnail: Page 
[276]
    [276]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
277
    277
  • Thumbnail: Page 
278
    278
  • Thumbnail: Page 
279
    279
  • Thumbnail: Page 
280
    280
  • Thumbnail: Page 
281
    281
  • Thumbnail: Page 
282
    282