Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Journal Article

Egg Temperature, Embryonic Metabolism, and Water Loss from the Eggs of Subantarctic Procellariiformes

C. R. Brown and N. J. Adams
Physiological Zoology
Vol. 61, No. 2 (Mar. - Apr., 1988), pp. 126-136
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30156143
Page Count: 11

You can always find the topics here!

Topics: Eggs, Petrels, Incubation, Water loss, Egg masses, Oxygen consumption, Embryos, Prions, Oxygen, Storms
Were these topics helpful?
See something inaccurate? Let us know!

Select the topics that are inaccurate.

Cancel
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($19.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Add to My Lists
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Egg Temperature, Embryonic Metabolism, and Water Loss from the Eggs of Subantarctic Procellariiformes
Preview not available

Abstract

Egg temperatures, embryonic metabolism, and water loss from the eggs of two large surface-nesting and three small burrow-nesting Procellariiformes from high latitude were measured for comparison with tropical species of the order. Egg temperatures, measured using blown eggs of the respective species containing transmitters, averaged 32.0 C, slightly lower than that reported for most tropical Procellariiformes. However, the difference appears to be related to different methods used to measure egg temperature rather than to differences related to geographical distribution. Mean daily rates of water loss ranged from 1,062 mg day⁻¹ for the large wandering albatross to 117 mg day⁻¹ for the very much smaller Salvin's prion and were comparable to water loss rates from similarly sized eggs of tropical species. Embryonic oxygen consumption increased throughout incubation and prepipping levels ranged from 1,698 ml O₂ day⁻¹ for wandering albatross to 221 ml O₂ day⁻¹ for Salvin's prions, similar to that of tropical species with similarly sized eggs. However, total oxygen consumed by embryos over the entire incubation period was higher in high-latitude Procellariiformes than in their tropical counterparts as a result of elevated pip-to-hatch and hatchling oxygen consumptions. Elevated hatchling oxygen consumptions may be related to higher thermoregulatory demands of chicks of Procellariiformes reared at high latitudes.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
126
    126
  • Thumbnail: Page 
127
    127
  • Thumbnail: Page 
128
    128
  • Thumbnail: Page 
129
    129
  • Thumbnail: Page 
130
    130
  • Thumbnail: Page 
131
    131
  • Thumbnail: Page 
132
    132
  • Thumbnail: Page 
133
    133
  • Thumbnail: Page 
134
    134
  • Thumbnail: Page 
135
    135
  • Thumbnail: Page 
136
    136