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Wagner's American Centennial March: Genesis and Reception

Lieselotte Z. Overvold
Monatshefte
Vol. 68, No. 2 (Summer, 1976), pp. 179-187
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30156682
Page Count: 9
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Wagner's American Centennial March: Genesis and Reception
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Abstract

The "Grand March" written by Richard Wagner in 1876 is a virtually forgotten piece of music. Yet some sparse bibliographical accounts and a few newspaper reviews that remain from that time still allow us to reconstruct the remarkable history of this composition and the events surrounding it. Intended as a contribution to the celebration of America's 100th anniversary of freedom and performed at the opening of the Philadelphia Exhibition, the work seems to have found a rather controversial reception. Nevertheless, the writing of the "Centennial March" constitutes an incident of considerable importance in the history of German-American relations and in the life of Richard Wagner himself.

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