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Temperature-Related Responses of Intermediary Metabolism to Forced Exercise and Recovery in Juvenile Rutilus rutilis (L.) (Cyprinidae: Teleostei)

Josef Dalla Via, Maria Huber, Wolfgang Wieser and Reinhard Lackner
Physiological Zoology
Vol. 62, No. 4 (Jul. - Aug., 1989), pp. 964-976
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30157940
Page Count: 13
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Temperature-Related Responses of Intermediary Metabolism to Forced Exercise and Recovery in Juvenile Rutilus rutilis (L.) (Cyprinidae: Teleostei)
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Abstract

Profiles of glycolytic and tricarboxylic-cycle metabolites were determined at 4° and 20° C in juvenile roach, Rutilus rutilus (L.), during rest (preexercise), at exhaustion, and at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, and 8 h of recovery. The time that elapsed between catching and freeze-clamping the whole fish was about 2 s. Starting from a preexercise concentration of about 0.4 μmol. g fresh wt⁻¹, lactate concentration increased only 15fold at 4° but 33-fold at 20° C. The smaller factor of increase at 4° C is interpreted as being due to the blockage of muscle activity at this low temperature. Other glycolytic and citrate-cycle metabolites reached their concentration maxima either during or immediately after the fish's burst of activity. During recovery the concentrations of metabolites follow exponential functions in their return to preexercise levels. This allows calculation of rate constants and $Q_{10}$ values of the major processes of recovery metabolism between 4° and 20° C. The average $Q_{10}$ value of these processes is 1. 74 ± 0.3. At 20° and 4° C it took about 2 and 8 h, respectively, for lactate and other glycolytic metabolites to return to preexercise levels. This also holds for glucose at 20° C, but at 4° C glucose remained elevated for at least 8 h postexercise. This is interpreted as a stress response. The role of constraining factors (size, temperature) in modulating the metabolic responses to exercise and recovery, and the choice of method in the determination of metabolite profiles in exercised fish, is discussed in relation to other published data.

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