Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Characterization of the Stress Protein Response in Two Species of Collisella Limpets with Different Temperature Tolerances

Brenda M. Sanders, Christopher Hope, Virginia M. Pascoe and Leslie S. Martin
Physiological Zoology
Vol. 64, No. 6 (Nov. - Dec., 1991), pp. 1471-1489
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30158225
Page Count: 19
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($19.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Characterization of the Stress Protein Response in Two Species of Collisella Limpets with Different Temperature Tolerances
Preview not available

Abstract

We have examined the role of stress proteins in adaptation through an interspecific study of the stress protein response in two species of Collisella limpets that occupy different intertidal habitats characterized by unique microclimates. Collisella scabra inhabits the high intertidal region, an unpredictable environment of temperature extremes. Collisella pelta lives in the more sheltered upper midtidal region. We conducted laboratory experiments to compare the temperature tolerance of each species and confirmed that C. scabra had a greater tolerance to acute heat shock. The stress protein response was also examined for both species using metabolic labeling and electrophoretic techniques. We found in C. scabra, but not in C. pelta, a highly complex group of low-molecular-weight (LMW) stress proteins (also called heat-shock proteins [hsp]) and multiple isoforms of hsp60. Other aspects of the response that also differed included (1) the temperature range at which the response was elicited, (2) the number of isoforms of hsp70 synthesized, and (3) the presence of stressproteins in the 35-40-kDa range in C. scabra. Further, the increase of radiolabel incorporation into hsp70 and the LMW stress proteins at higher temperatures relative to control temperatures was greater for C. scabra. These aspects of the stress protein response may play a role in allowing C. scabra to tolerate the temperature extremes of the high intertidal region that provides it with access to food sources not available to closely related but more temperature-sensitive species.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
1471
    1471
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1472
    1472
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1473
    1473
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1474
    1474
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1475
    1475
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1476
    1476
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1477
    1477
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1478
    1478
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1479
    1479
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1480
    1480
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1481
    1481
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1482
    1482
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1483
    1483
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1484
    1484
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1485
    1485
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1486
    1486
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1487
    1487
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1488
    1488
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1489
    1489