Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Preferred Body Temperature, Metabolic Physiology, and Water Balance of Adult Cicindela longilabris: A Comparison of Populations from Boreal Habitats and Climatic Refugia

Thomas D. Schultz, Michael C. Quinlan and Neil F. Hadley
Physiological Zoology
Vol. 65, No. 1 (Jan. - Feb., 1992), pp. 226-242
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30158248
Page Count: 17
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($19.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Preferred Body Temperature, Metabolic Physiology, and Water Balance of Adult Cicindela longilabris: A Comparison of Populations from Boreal Habitats and Climatic Refugia
Preview not available

Abstract

Preferred body temperatures, water-loss rates (WLR), and standard metabolic rates (SMR) were measured for adult tiger beetles (Cicindela longilabris) from disjunct populations in Arizona, Colorado, Maine, and Wisconsin. The mean body temperatures of foraging C. longilabris did not vary significantly among the four populations. The mean body temperatures of basking (29.7° C), foraging (34.1° C), and stilting (36.2° C) C. longilabris were lower than those recorded for most Cicindela species. Mean WLR of live beetles in dry air at 30° C (21.2-25.2 μg cm⁻² h⁻¹ mmHg⁻¹) was not significantly different among populations and was similar to WLR of other upland cicindelids. The SMR measured at 15°, 25°, and 30° C for freshly captured beetles varied among populations but converged after all beetles were acclimated at 25° C. Differences in SMR among populations after acclimation could not be discerned; however, the pooled SMR for C. longilabris were higher than SMR for other Cicindela species over the same temperature range. The results indicate that C. longilabris is adapted to cooler climates than are experienced by most cicindelids and are consistent with the hypothesis that C. longilabris occupies climatic refugia at lower latitudes.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
226
    226
  • Thumbnail: Page 
227
    227
  • Thumbnail: Page 
228
    228
  • Thumbnail: Page 
229
    229
  • Thumbnail: Page 
230
    230
  • Thumbnail: Page 
231
    231
  • Thumbnail: Page 
232
    232
  • Thumbnail: Page 
233
    233
  • Thumbnail: Page 
234
    234
  • Thumbnail: Page 
235
    235
  • Thumbnail: Page 
236
    236
  • Thumbnail: Page 
[237]
    [237]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
238
    238
  • Thumbnail: Page 
239
    239
  • Thumbnail: Page 
240
    240
  • Thumbnail: Page 
241
    241
  • Thumbnail: Page 
242
    242