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The Roles of Aerobic and Anaerobic Metabolism in Active Spiders

Kenneth N. Prestwich
Physiological Zoology
Vol. 56, No. 1 (Jan., 1983), pp. 122-132
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30159973
Page Count: 11
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Roles of Aerobic and Anaerobic Metabolism in Active Spiders
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Abstract

The relative importance of aerobic and anaerobic metabolism in active spiders was investigated in four species, Filistata hibernalis, Lycosa lenta, Phidippus audax, and Neoscona domiciliorium. Peak $\dot{V}O_{2}$ varied from 2.3 to 5.8 times the resting $\dot{V}O_{2}$. These relatively low increases are suggested as being partially due to arrested hemolymph circulation to the active prosomal muscles. Aerobic capacities were directly correlated with book lung surface area. Late in exercise or early in recovery, about 10%-20% of the individual Lycosa, Filistata, or Phidippus released large (>100 μl) volumes of gas that were composed of gases in addition to CO₂. Estimates of the relative importance of anaerobic metabolism to total power generation during short, maximal struggles (less than 2 min) varied from 55% to 94% of the total power generation. Anaerobic dependence was inversely associated with respiratory surface area. The anaerobic contribution to construction of orb webs in Neoscona domiciliorium was estimated to be about 1% of the total cost of the web. Calculations based on lactate accumulations, recovery oxygen, and the known stoichiometry of gluconeogenesis and complete oxidation of lactate suggest most of the lactate accumulated during a struggle is reconverted to hexose during the recovery period.

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