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Understanding Mixed Quotation

Mark McCullagh
Mind
New Series, Vol. 116, No. 464 (Oct., 2007), pp. 927-946
Published by: Oxford University Press on behalf of the Mind Association
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30166516
Page Count: 20
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Understanding Mixed Quotation
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Abstract

It has proved challenging to account for the dual role that a directly quoted part of a 'that'-clause plays in so-called mixed quotation. The Davidsonian account, elaborated by Cappelen and Lepore, handles many cases well; but it fails to accommodate a crucial feature of mixed quotation: that the part enclosed in quotation marks is used to specify not what the quoter says when she utters it, but what the quoted speaker says when she utters it. Here I show how the Davidsonian can do better. The proposal rests on the idea that mixed quotation involves deferred demonstration: a mixed quotati on specifies what the subject says partly by demonstrating the quoter's utterance of the unquoted part and partly by deferred-demonstrating the subject's utterance of the quotation-marked part.

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