Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Der Kreisauer Kreis und die künftige Neuordnung Deutschlands und Europas

Hans Mommsen
Vierteljahrshefte für Zeitgeschichte
42. Jahrg., 3. H. (Jul., 1994), pp. 361-377
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30195459
Page Count: 17
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Der Kreisauer Kreis und die künftige Neuordnung Deutschlands und Europas
Preview not available

Abstract

Helmuth James von Moltke and his followers firmly believed the fall of Hitler's dictatorship would fundamentally change the political course occidental civilisation would take. Any traces of the destructive path which had led from secularization to individualism and liberalism, from capitalist mass society to the final stages of Nazi authoritarianism would be replaced by a new and political order. The basic philosophical concept of the Kreisau group was set forth by Helmuth von Moltke and his inner circle. The Munich Jesuits expressed the same ideas and participated in conceptualizing the Kreisau tenets. Their conviction that post war society needed a new beginning was not solely restricted to Germany. Thus, the Kreisau circle envisaged a truly European solution, and in some respects, anticipated contemporary European thought. The primary significance of the Kreisau group rested in its steadfast conviction that restoring the image of man as a responsible social being was the key to change. Thus, Moltke and his supporters purported a revolution of the mind, as well as of the social and economic conditions which had led to Nazi rule. Kreisau became aware of the anomaly of German society under Nazi rule. Only by restoring basic social relations among men could the regeneration of the body politic be attained.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[361]
    [361]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
362
    362
  • Thumbnail: Page 
363
    363
  • Thumbnail: Page 
364
    364
  • Thumbnail: Page 
365
    365
  • Thumbnail: Page 
366
    366
  • Thumbnail: Page 
367
    367
  • Thumbnail: Page 
368
    368
  • Thumbnail: Page 
369
    369
  • Thumbnail: Page 
370
    370
  • Thumbnail: Page 
371
    371
  • Thumbnail: Page 
372
    372
  • Thumbnail: Page 
373
    373
  • Thumbnail: Page 
374
    374
  • Thumbnail: Page 
375
    375
  • Thumbnail: Page 
376
    376
  • Thumbnail: Page 
377
    377