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Psychological Foundations of Instructional Design for Emerging Computer-Based Instructional Technologies: Part II

Michael J. Hannafin and Lloyd P. Rieber
Educational Technology Research and Development
Vol. 37, No. 2 (1989), pp. 102-114
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30218271
Page Count: 13
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Psychological Foundations of Instructional Design for Emerging Computer-Based Instructional Technologies: Part II
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Abstract

Although considerable research has been published concerning learning and cognition in general, little impact has been reported on the design of computer-based instruction (CBI). In addition, CBI designs have been influenced negatively by technocentric perspectives, where technological capabilities dictate lesson activities, rather than a more reflective view on the relationship among learner, learning task and performance requirements, and the selective use of media capabilities. Attempts to extrapolate the relevance of non-CBI research and theory to advance a comprehensive and integrated view of the design of CBI have been rare. An integrated meta-model derived from both CBI and non-CBI research and theory is presented in this article.

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