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Training Designers to Think about Thinking

Susan M. Markle
Journal of Instructional Development
Vol. 4, No. 3 (Spring, 1981), pp. 24-27
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30220647
Page Count: 4
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Training Designers to Think about Thinking
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Abstract

Instructional products can be characterized as reaching three different levels of achievement: (1) students remember the information presented; (2) students can apply conceptual classification schemes, can apply rules, or can follow procedures; (3) students can discover how conceptual and rule-governed structures work. While memory is often a useful outcome, it does not imply the ability to use the knowledge. Ability to think at an adult level is an increasingly called-for outcome, especially among science educators, an outcome that calls for new ways of designing instruction. Designs that enable students to apply conceptual schemes and rules do not foster thinking skill development. The pursuit of efficiency and content coverage in instructional products will have to be sacrificed in some cases in order to train students in thinking skills.

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