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Risk Factors for Antibiotic-Resistant E. coli in Children in a Rural Area

J. C. Seidman, P. Anitha K., R. Kanungo, A. L. Bourgeois and C. L. Coles
Epidemiology and Infection
Vol. 137, No. 6 (Jun., 2009), pp. 879-888
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30221689
Page Count: 10
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Risk Factors for Antibiotic-Resistant E. coli in Children in a Rural Area
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Abstract

We surveyed antimicrobial susceptibility in faecal Escherichia coli in primary schoolchildren in rural Tamil Nadu, India. Resistance profiles of E. coli samples from local water sources were also obtained. We investigated sociodemographic characteristics as risk factors for resistance and local paediatric prescription patterns. In 119 stool samples, carriage of resistance to ≥ 1 antibiotic was 63% and multiple drug resistance was 32%. Resistance outcomes were associated with school of attendance, having a sibling attend the same school, younger age, and less crowded households. Eight of nine water samples were resistant to ≥ 1 antibiotic. Recent history of medication use was not associated with resistance carriage. Resistance patterns may have been influenced by local paediatric prescription patterns and veterinary antibiotic use. Frequent, low-cost surveillance of commensal resistance can guide development of locally appropriate treatment guidelines. Schoolbased hygiene programmes should be considered as means of limiting the spread of antibiotic resistance.

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