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Effects of Elevated Carbon Dioxide and Ozone on Volatile Terpenoid Emissions and Multitrophic Communication of Transgenic Insecticidal Oilseed Rape (Brassica napus)

Sari J. Himanen, Anne-Marja Nerg, Anne Nissinen, Delia M. Pinto, C. Neal Stewart Jr., Guy M. Poppy and Jarmo K. Holopainen
The New Phytologist
Vol. 181, No. 1 (Jan., 2009), pp. 174-186
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the New Phytologist Trust
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30225827
Page Count: 13
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Effects of Elevated Carbon Dioxide and Ozone on Volatile Terpenoid Emissions and Multitrophic Communication of Transgenic Insecticidal Oilseed Rape (Brassica napus)
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Abstract

Does transgenically incorporated insect resistance affect constitutive and herbivoreinducible terpenoid emissions and multitrophic communication under elevated atmospheric CO₂ or ozone (O₃)? This study aimed to clarify the possible interactions between allocation to direct defences (Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxin production) and that to endogenous indirect defences under future climatic conditions. Terpenoid emissions were measured from vegetative-stage non-Bt and Bt Brassica napus grown in growth chambers under control or doubled CO₂, and control (filtered air) or 100 ppb O₃. The olfactometric orientation of Cotesia vestalis, an endoparasitoid of the herbivorous diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella), was assessed under the corresponding CO₂ and O₃ concentrations. The response of terpenoid emission to CO₂ or O₃ elevations was equivalent for Bt and non-Bt plants, but lower target herbivory reduced herbivore-inducible emissions from Bt plants. Elevated CO₂ increased emissions of most terpenoids, whereas O₃ reduced total terpenoid emissions. Cotesia vestalis orientated to host-damaged plants independent of plant type or CO₂ concentration. Under elevated O₃, host-damaged non-Bt plants attracted 75% of the parasitoids, but only 36.8% of parasitoids orientated to host-damaged Bt plants. Elevated O₃ has the potential to perturb specialized food-web communication in Bt crops.

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