Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

More than a Carbon Economy: Nutrient Trade and Ecological Sustainability in Facultative Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbioses

F. Andrew Smith, Emily J. Grace and Sally E. Smith
The New Phytologist
Vol. 182, No. 2 (Apr., 2009), pp. 347-358
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the New Phytologist Trust
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30225844
Page Count: 12
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
More than a Carbon Economy: Nutrient Trade and Ecological Sustainability in Facultative Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbioses
Preview not available

Abstract

Symbiosis is well recognized as a major force in plant ecology and evolution. However, there is considerable uncertainty about the functional, ecological and evolutionary benefits of the very widespread facultative arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) associations, in which the plants can grow and reproduce whether or not they are colonized by AM fungi. Here we address the significance of new research findings that are overturning conventional views that facultative AM associations can be likened to parasitic fungus-plant associations. Specifically, we address the occurrence and importance of phosphate uptake via AM fungi that does not result in increases in total phosphorus (P) uptake or in plant growth, and possible signalling between AM fungi and plants that can result in plant growth depressions even when fungal colonization remains very low. We conclude that, depending on the individual AM fungi that are present, the role of facultative AM associations in the field, especially in relation to plant competition, may be much more subtle than has been previously envisaged.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
347
    347
  • Thumbnail: Page 
348
    348
  • Thumbnail: Page 
349
    349
  • Thumbnail: Page 
350
    350
  • Thumbnail: Page 
351
    351
  • Thumbnail: Page 
352
    352
  • Thumbnail: Page 
353
    353
  • Thumbnail: Page 
354
    354
  • Thumbnail: Page 
355
    355
  • Thumbnail: Page 
356
    356
  • Thumbnail: Page 
357
    357
  • Thumbnail: Page 
358
    358