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The Logic of Dominance Reasoning

John Cantwell
Journal of Philosophical Logic
Vol. 35, No. 1 (Feb., 2006), pp. 41-63
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30226858
Page Count: 23
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The Logic of Dominance Reasoning
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Abstract

The logic of dominance arguments is analyzed using two different kinds of conditionals: indicative (epistemic) and subjunctive (counter-factual). It is shown that on the indicative interpretation an assumption of independence is needed for a dominance argument to go through. It is also shown that on the subjunctive interpretation no assumption of independence is needed once the standard premises of the dominance argument are true, but that independence plays an important role in arguing for the truth of the premises of the dominance argument. A key feature of the analysis is the interpretation of the doubly conditional comparative "I will get a better outcome if A than if B" which is taken to have the structure "(the outcome if A) is better than (the outcome if B)".

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