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The Phenomenological Experience of Interpersonal Spacing

J. Guthrie Ford, Martha Knight and Robert Cramer
Sociometry
Vol. 40, No. 4 (Dec., 1977), pp. 387-390
DOI: 10.2307/3033490
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3033490
Page Count: 4
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The Phenomenological Experience of Interpersonal Spacing
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Abstract

This research sought to explore an experiential state of social spacing, specifically, the actor's experience of interpersonal distance (cognitive distance). Distance judgments were measured by having college-age females approach an inanimate object, replicating a previous interpersonal distance. It was hypothesized that inappropriately close spacing would result in underestimation of objective distance. This prediction was statistically confirmed, and numerous control conditions clarified the finding. The results were discussed in terms of sensory-tonic field theory, and further research of cognitive distance stemming from this theory was suggested.

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