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Standards, Expectations, and Interpersonal Influence

Martha Foschi, G. Keith Warriner and Stephen D. Hart
Social Psychology Quarterly
Vol. 48, No. 2 (Jun., 1985), pp. 108-117
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3033606
Page Count: 10
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Standards, Expectations, and Interpersonal Influence
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Abstract

One hundred and twenty males and females, participating in same-sex dyads, were assigned at random to one of five treatments: four experimental and one control. Half the subjects in the experimental groups were given better scores at the task than their partners, half received worse scores. In turn, each half was divided into two levels of standards: scores were either definite indication of ability in one person and lack of ability in the other, or could not be conclusively interpreted. Control subjects received neither scores nor standard. Of four hypotheses relating expectations in each treatment to acceptance of influence from the partner, three are supported. Lack of support for the fourth is traced to a manipulation failure: the two levels of assigned standards did not create two distinct conditions for males receiving lower scores than their partners. Results are examined, and the importance of incorporating standards into the study of performance expectations discussed.

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