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Reflected Appraisal and the Development of Self

Richard B. Felson
Social Psychology Quarterly
Vol. 48, No. 1 (Mar., 1985), pp. 71-78
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3033783
Page Count: 8
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Reflected Appraisal and the Development of Self
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Abstract

A reveiw of recent survey research suggests that the importance of the reflected-appraisal process has been exaggerated by the symbolic interactionists. Communication barriers make it difficult to make accurate reflected appraisals and for some attributes, institutionalized indicators of performance are used rather than the reflected (or perceived) appraisals of others. In the second part of the paper, data from children in fourth-through eighth-grade classrooms are reanalyzed in order to estimate the effect of the reflected appraisals of peers on self-appraisals of physical attractiveness. The results suggest that the reflected appraisals of peers are an important source of self-appraisals of physical attractiveness, and reflected appraisals are likely to be more important for attributes that are defined in terms of the perceptions of others.

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