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Social Structure, Belief, Attitude, Intention, and Behavior: A Partial Test of Liska's Revisions

Richard A. Davis
Social Psychology Quarterly
Vol. 48, No. 1 (Mar., 1985), pp. 89-93
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3033786
Page Count: 5
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Social Structure, Belief, Attitude, Intention, and Behavior: A Partial Test of Liska's Revisions
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Abstract

In a recent critique Allen Liska (1984) pointed out a potential weakness in the Fishbein/Ajzen model (1975): by assuming a fully recursive model, Liska believes that Fishbein and Ajzen miss some of the subtleties of the relationship between beliefs, attitudes, intentions, and behavior. In this paper the Wisconsin model is used to test Liska's notion that social status does not exert its total influence on behavior through attitudes, subjective norms and, finally, behavioral intentions, as Fishbein and Ajzen contend. While the results do not fully accord with Liska's contention, neither do they fully support the Fishbein/Ajzen model: the centrality of intentions is not lost, but neither are the effects of social status totally mediated by behavioral intentions.

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