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Humor as a Technique of Social Influence

Karen O'Quin and Joel Aronoff
Social Psychology Quarterly
Vol. 44, No. 4 (Dec., 1981), pp. 349-357
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3033903
Page Count: 9
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Humor as a Technique of Social Influence
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Abstract

In a dyadic bargaining paradigm, at a predetermined point in the negotiation, subjects received an influence attempt from a confederate that varied in size and was administered in either a humorous or a nonhumorous way. Results support the major hypothesis that humor results in an increased financial concession. The use of humor led to a more positive evaluation of the task and marginally lessened self-reported tension, but did not increase liking for the partner. Consistent with past research using social tasks, females laughed and smiled more than males.

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