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Women on the Quirinal Hill: Patronage in Rome, 1560-1630

Carolyn Valone
The Art Bulletin
Vol. 76, No. 1 (Mar., 1994), pp. 129-146
Published by: College Art Association
DOI: 10.2307/3046006
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3046006
Page Count: 18
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Women on the Quirinal Hill: Patronage in Rome, 1560-1630
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Abstract

Women in early modern Rome often used their own wealth to mold the physical city and its spiritual life by means of architectural patronage. From 1560 to 1630 ten women commissioned eleven architectural complexes in the region of the Quirinal Hill which influenced the development of the urban fabric and also supported radical reform in the early Counter-Reformation. Furthermore, these women were aware that they were participating in the well-known tradition of matron as patron which stretched back to Early Christian Rome.

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