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Flagellin Stimulation of Intestinal Epithelial Cells Triggers CCL20-Mediated Migration of Dendritic Cells

Frédéric Sierro, Bertrand Dubois, Alix Coste, Dominique Kaiserlian, Jean-Pierre Kraehenbuhl and Jean-Claude Sirard
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 98, No. 24 (Nov. 20, 2001), pp. 13722-13727
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3057161
Page Count: 6
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Flagellin Stimulation of Intestinal Epithelial Cells Triggers CCL20-Mediated Migration of Dendritic Cells
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Abstract

Enteropathogenic bacteria elicit mucosal innate and adaptive immune responses. We investigated whether gut epithelial cells played a role in triggering an adaptive immune response by recruiting dendritic cells (DCs). Immature DCs are selectively attracted by the CCL20 chemokine. The expression of the CCL20 gene in human intestinal epithelial cell lines was up-regulated by pathogenic bacteria, including Salmonella species, but not by indigenous bacteria of the intestinal flora. The Salmonella machinery for epithelial cell invasion was not required for CCL20 gene activation. Flagellin but not the lipopolysaccharide was found to be the Salmonella factor responsible for stimulation of epithelial CCL20 production. CCL20 in turn triggered a specific migration of immature DCs. Our data show that crosstalk between bacterial flagellin and epithelial cells is essential for the recruitment of DCs, a mechanism that could be instrumental to initiate adaptive immune responses in the gut.

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