Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Transfer RNA-Dependent Amino Acid Biosynthesis: An Essential Route to Asparagine Formation

Bokkee Min, Joanne T. Pelaschier, David E. Graham, Debra Tumbula-Hansen and Dieter Söll
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 99, No. 5 (Mar. 5, 2002), pp. 2678-2683
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3058008
Page Count: 6
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Transfer RNA-Dependent Amino Acid Biosynthesis: An Essential Route to Asparagine Formation
Preview not available

Abstract

Biochemical experiments and genomic sequence analysis showed that Deinococcus radiodurans and Thermus thermophilus do not possess asparagine synthetase (encoded by asnA or asnB), the enzyme forming asparagine from aspartate. Instead these organisms derive asparagine from asparaginyl-tRNA, which is made from aspartate in the tRNA-dependent transamidation pathway [Becker, H. D. & Kern, D. (1998) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 95, 12832-12837; and Curnow, A. W., Tumbula, D. L., Pelaschier, J. T., Min, B. & Söll, D. (1998) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 95, 12838-12843]. A genetic knockout disrupting this pathway deprives D. radiodurans of the ability to synthesize asparagine and confers asparagine auxotrophy. The organism's capacity to make asparagine could be restored by transformation with Escherichia coli asnB. This result demonstrates that in Deinococcus, the only route to asparagine is via asparaginyl-tRNA. Analysis of the completed genomes of many bacteria reveal that, barring the existence of an unknown pathway of asparagine biosynthesis, a wide spectrum of bacteria rely on the tRNA-dependent transamidation pathway as the sole route to asparagine.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
2678
    2678
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2679
    2679
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2680
    2680
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2681
    2681
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2682
    2682
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2683
    2683