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Linkage Disequilibrium between the Beta Frequency of the Human EEG and a GABAA Receptor Gene Locus

Bernice Porjesz, Laura Almasy, Howard J. Edenberg, Kongming Wang, David B. Chorlian, Tatiana Foroud, Alison Goate, John P. Rice, Sean J. O'Connor, John Rohrbaugh, Samuel Kuperman, Lance O. Bauer, Raymond R. Crowe, Marc A. Schuckit, Victor Hesselbrock, P. Michael Conneally, Jay A. Tischfield, Ting-Kai Li, Theodore Reich and Henri Begleiter
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 99, No. 6 (Mar. 19, 2002), pp. 3729-3733
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3058195
Page Count: 5
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Linkage Disequilibrium between the Beta Frequency of the Human EEG and a GABAA Receptor Gene Locus
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Abstract

Human brain oscillations represent important features of information processing and are highly heritable. A common feature of beta oscillations (13-28 Hz) is the critical involvement of networks of inhibitory interneurons as pacemakers, gated by γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) action. Advances in molecular and statistical genetics permit examination of quantitative traits such as the beta frequency of the human electroencephalogram in conjunction with DNA markers. We report a significant linkage and linkage disequilibrium between beta frequency and a set of GABAA receptor genes. Uncovering the genes influencing brain oscillations provides a better understanding of the neural function involved in information processing.

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