Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Intestinal Adenomas Can Develop with a Stable Karyotype and Stable Microsatellites

Kevin M. Haigis, James G. Caya, Mark Reichelderfer and William F. Dove
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 99, No. 13 (Jun. 25, 2002), pp. 8927-8931
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3059117
Page Count: 5
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Intestinal Adenomas Can Develop with a Stable Karyotype and Stable Microsatellites
Preview not available

Abstract

Loss of function of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC)/Apc tumor suppressor gene occurs early in the etiology of intestinal cancer in mammals. In human colonic tumors, genomic instability is proposed to be associated with tumor initiation by inducing loss of APC function. We have used a mouse model of inherited intestinal cancer (ApcMin/+, Min/+) to analyze the earliest stages of tumorigenesis in this organ. We find that tumors from C57BL/6 Min/+ mice have a stable karyotype and stable microsatellites. In contrast to previous claims, we find that homozygosity for the Min allele of Apc in tumors can proceed by homologous somatic recombination. Further, our analysis of early, benign human colorectal adenomas failed to reveal any evidence for generalized chromosomal or microsatellite instability. These results cast doubt on the hypothesis that either of these forms of genomic instability is necessary for the initial development of colorectal adenomas. We contrast our analysis of autochthonous primary tumors to other studies involving xenografts or cultured cells.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
8927
    8927
  • Thumbnail: Page 
8928
    8928
  • Thumbnail: Page 
8929
    8929
  • Thumbnail: Page 
8930
    8930
  • Thumbnail: Page 
8931
    8931