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Previously Uncharacterized Genes in the UV- and MMS-Induced DNA Damage Response in Yeast

Denise Hanway, Jodie K. Chin, Gang Xia, Guy Oshiro, Elizabeth A. Winzeler and Floyd E. Romesberg
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 99, No. 16 (Aug. 6, 2002), pp. 10605-10610
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3059438
Page Count: 6
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Previously Uncharacterized Genes in the UV- and MMS-Induced DNA Damage Response in Yeast
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Abstract

A competitive growth assay has been used to identify yeast genes involved in the repair of UV- or MMS-induced DNA damage. A collection of 2,827 yeast strains was analyzed in which each strain has a single ORF replaced with a cassette containing two unique sequence tags, allowing for its detection by hybridization to a high-density oligonucleotide array. The hybridization data identify a high percentage of the deletion strains present in the collection that were previously characterized as being sensitive to the DNA-damaging agents. The assay, and subsequent analysis, has been used to identify six genes not formerly known to be involved in the damage response, whose deletion renders the yeast sensitive to UV or MMS treatment. The recently identified genes include three uncharacterized ORFs, as well as genes that encode protein products implicated in ubiquitination, gene silencing, and transport across the mitochondrial membrane. Epistatsis analysis of four of the genes was performed to determine the DNA damage repair pathways in which the protein products function.

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